Breville Pressure Cooker Lawsuit

In 2015, Breville recalled over 35,000 pressure cookers because ambiguous assembly instructions pose a burn and injury threat to the consumer.

Special Note From Attorney Michael Johnson
Our law firm is deeply involved in this litigation and our lawyers currently represent over 175 clients who have been severely burned by exploding pressure cookers.  We are actively filing new pressure cooker lawsuits across the country and would be honored to speak with you.

To contact us for a Free Case Evaluation, please visit our contact form or dial (800) 279-6386.

The Breville Fast Slow Cooker poses an immediate safety threat for anyone near or around one in use. The company has recalled over 35,000 models due to a number of burn injuries sustained by consumers.

Illusive labeling on the Breville pressure cooker sealing gasket has caused users to insert it incorrectly during assembly. This has caused the appliance to explode due to an unintentional window of opportunity for steam to escape through built-up pressure. As a point of reference, many pressure cookers reach temperatures well over 200 degrees Fahrenheit.

The 6-quart electric device is used as both a pressure cooker and slow cooker combination. The problem is with the labeling of the sealing gasket. It reads “TOP” to indicate the direction the seal should face when inserted during assembly.

Consumers have been under the impression that the arrow means it should point to the top of the pot. Therefore, this misinformation creates the uneven sealing of the lid and has unfortunately resulted in the explosion of hot contents on unsuspecting consumers. The result is potential burn or injury to anyone nearby.

The potential misreading and unclear assembly instructions of the sealing gasket caused Breville to recall the device to prevent consumers from injuring themselves.

The company recalled over 35,000 models in the United States after a woman was severely injured with second degree burns when her pressure cooker exploded. Scalding hot contents, liquid, and fat spewed onto her which resulted in 10% burns to her body. If you are among one of the thousands of consumers who purchased this model, we suggest you stop using it immediately.

The models affected are BPR600XL with batch numbers between 1235 and 1529 (numbers are located on the bottom of the device). They were manufactured and sold between September 2015 and October 2015 at retailers such as Macy’s, Best Buy, Sur la Table, Williams-Sonoma, Crate & Barrel, Bed, Bath and Beyond, and online.

Injured by a Breville Pressure Cooker? Contact the lawyers at Johnson // Becker today.

Due to a number of similar injuries, Australia and New Zealand spearheaded a recall in October 2015 as well (model number BPR200 and batch numbers between 1034 to 1511).

Pressure cookers are appealing to use in the kitchen due to their efficiency at not only heating contents up, but cooking them as well. They operate by trapping heat within the pot and are sealed by an air-tight lid to prevent steam from escaping. This causes a build-up of pressure within the device.

Therefore, ensuring that steam has no chance of being released until the cook cycle completes is paramount to avoiding a potential explosion; especially when it comes to the understandability of labeling and assembly instructions.

Should you contact a pressure cooker lawyer?

If you or a loved one has been injured by a defective pressure cooker, you may want to speak with the pressure cooker lawyers at Johnson // Becker. We are actively filing new pressure cooker lawsuits across the county and you may be entitled to financial compensation for your burn injuries.

We offer a Free Case Evaluation. Please contact us using the form below or by calling us at (800) 279-6386. We would be honored to speak with you and respond promptly to every inquiry we receive.

Free Case Evaluation

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